What You Need to Know About IBM's End of Service for IBM i 6.1 Announcement

Posted by Mark Rabin

9/17/14 7:30 AM

IBM has announced that September 30, 2015 will see the end of service for Version 6.1 of the IBM i Operating System and Licensed Programs. This aligns with IBM’s history of keeping two OS versions “active” at a time.  IBM will also withdraw support for DB2 Web Query version 1.1.x.  For clients needing support beyond that date, IBM plans to provide an option to purchase extended support.  We anticipate this will be similar to the support offering IBM currently provides for V5R4 clients.    

IBM i 6.1 became available in March of 2008.  At that time it was considered a significant step forward in functionality and performance.  6.1 brought us a number of technologies we now take for granted including, PowerVM, SSD’s, PowerHA, the web-based system console, encrypted backups and more.  This release also saw the change in naming from Version-Release to the more common “dot” system, i.e., Version 5 Release 4 to IBM i 6.1.  Since the advent of the Technology Refresh in IBM i 7.1, IBM is able to continue to add significant new functionality without the need for a new O/S version.  So we have seen the tradition of a new OS version every two years stretch to four years.  IBM i 7.1 has been available since March 2010 and IBM i 7.2 was released in June 2014.

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Topics: Core Infrastructure, IBM

A New Generation of IBM Power Servers is Coming

Posted by Mark Rabin

4/23/14 8:00 AM

I have been around IBM's Power Systems since 2001 when IBM unified the RS/6000 and the AS/400 onto POWER4 and I have seen the Power platform continue to evolve. In my opinion the latest evolution looks to be a significant step forward, even as the Power7+ processor still outperforms many competing platforms. 

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Topics: News & Opinion, IBM

Impressions from IBM Partnerworld and Tableau Software Partner Conference

Posted by Christian Franklin

3/6/14 10:27 AM

As I was making my way to San Francisco International (SFO) the dread of spending the better part of a week and Valentine’s day in Las Vegas started to sink in.  The upside was that I was going to be able to cover two conferences in one fell swoop and they were at hotels right next to each other.  My schedule was to cover IBM’s PartnerWorld and Tableau Software’s newly launched partner conference which was more buzz for me because I’ve been working with the new version of Tableau Desktop and have quickly become enamored with its capabilities and intuitiveness. 

Does the following scenario ever happen to you?  An observation in daily life gets you asking questions which starts a mental exercise that turns into thinking about data...  Well, the SFO security checkpoint was one of those moments for me.  I arrived at the security checkpoint in Terminal 2, expecting to breeze through to my gate (because of the 'TSA pre-check' stamp on my boarding pass) and get to the Virgin America gate with plenty of time to spare.  Well, so much for expectations - I continued to stand in line and observe 4 lanes and one expensive whole body scanner stand idle.  This got me wondering if the airport authority, TSA, and airline reservation systems do any data analysis on this.  My conclusion is that they don’t even though on the surface it should be pretty simple to extract de-identified data and run a baseline analysis of security gate load at specified times.  As good as Virgin America's customer experience is it's off set by the TSA's customer experience.  Don't get me wrong, they have an important role to play but in my experience, they don't give a rip about customer experience. Back to the conferences...

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Topics: Analytics, IBM, Tableau

Storage Optimization Made Easy with IBM Real-time Compression and Easy Tier

Posted by Mark Rabin

1/24/14 11:00 AM

Statistics about disk storage growth are everywhere. 

Depending on who you're talking to you might hear “Global disk storage is growing 40 percent per year” or “Enterprise disk demand is increasing by 50 percent per year.”  Well in the real world of our clients the number may not be quite that high, but it is certainly growing in the double digits.  While the cost of technology keeps dropping, the cost of storage is still increasing as capacity growth demands exceed price reductions.  And the energy costs of storage are not to be discounted.  To get a clear idea of cost start with the price of the disk drive, add in housing the drive (in a storage array or SAN), then add maintenance, energy costs to run and cool the drive, and it adds up quickly.  The fully loaded cost of a disk drive could be around $1,500 to more than $3,000 per drive over a 3 year period. 

 

What if you could store three to five times as much data on each disk drive? 

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Topics: Core Infrastructure, IBM

New IBM i Client Software for PC, Mac and Linux Workstations

Posted by Mark Rabin

12/3/13 9:30 AM

 

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Topics: IBM

Smarter Computing - IBM Power Servers Refreshed

Posted by Mark Rabin

2/6/13 8:08 AM

Picture1 resized 600 Key points from the February 5 IBM Power Systems Announcement

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Topics: Cloud & DevOps, IBM